Improving Student Learning One Teacher at a Time

Jane E. Pollock will present what really works in schools to improve student learning – the teacher.  She introduces research that supports the premise that the individual teacher who uses “The Big Four” makes the difference for improving learning and the principal who supervises accordingly directly contributes to the gains.

 Teachers who:

  1. Use learning targets, ones that are robust, not just daily classroom objectives
  2. Use instructional strategies that work to help the learner remember and apply information and skills, not just do schoolwork
  3. Use varied assessment strategies to provide formative feedback
  4. Track classroom data through grading, record keeping, and reporting for improvement “beyond the curve”  and program development 

In addition, for principals and coaches, Jane E. Pollock recommends retooling the Teaching Master Learners Schema for supervision to directly improve student learning. When supervisors use the same schema to guide conferences about classroom observations that teachers use to plan lessons, the interaction between them results in improved performances for both teachers and students.

Improving Student Learning One Principal at a Time

Supervision models provide structure for the collaboration between the supervisor and teacher to discuss classroom observations in order to improve teaching.  So, why do classroom observations seem nerve-wracking and sometimes perfunctory to the principal and the teacher?  Jane E. Pollock recommends retooling the Teaching Master Learners Schema from Improving Student Learning One Teacher at a Time (ASCD 2007) into the process so principals or coaches give feedback to the teacher to directly improve student learning, as described in Improving Student Learning One Principal at a Time (ASCD 2009). When supervisors use the same schema to guide conferences about classroom observations that teachers use to plan lessons, the interaction between them results in improved performances for both teachers and students.

Principals will find practical strategies that provide a necessary complement to their current evaluation and supervision frameworks.